Last edited by Vuran
Thursday, October 8, 2020 | History

6 edition of Dr. Livingstone, I presume? found in the catalog.

Dr. Livingstone, I presume?

Ian Anstruther

Dr. Livingstone, I presume?

by Ian Anstruther

  • 116 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published by Dutton in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Stanley, Henry M. 1841-1904,
  • Livingstone, David, 1813-1873

  • Edition Notes

    Published in London in 1956 under title: I presume.

    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsDT351.S9 A6 1957
    The Physical Object
    Pagination207 p.
    Number of Pages207
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL6220552M
    LC Control Number57005333
    OCLC/WorldCa1667579

    Executive summary: Dr. Livingstone, I presume? Brother: Charles Livingstone Wife: Mary Moffat (dau. of missionary Robert Moffat, m. 2-Jan) Son: Robert (d. 5-Dec in US Civil War) High School: Anderson College University: University of Glasgow Royal Geographical Society Died Intestate Proxy Baptism: Mormon St. George, UT (Aug)Born: Stanley swore he uttered the words, “Dr. Livingstone, I presume,” but the page pertaining to that moment was torn out of his journal. It is possible that it went missing in an act of sabotage.

    Dr Livingstone, I presume. Taken from: HM Stanley, How I found Livingstone: travels, adventures, and discoveries in Central Africa, including four months' residence with Dr. Livingstone. London: S. Low, Marston, Low, and Searle, First edition of Stanley's book held in the College library. In a brilliant book Clare Pettitt tells the story of their meeting and what led up to it, and the reactions to it of contemporaries and afterwards. The 'truth' is complicated. Livingstone, the crusading missionary had often cooperated with the slave-traders.

    “Livingstone’s Missionary Tales” had already been a bestseller. He now wanted to outdo other explorers and find the sources of the Nile. But after 5 years of travelling he was widely assumed to be dead. At that point, Stanley turned up with his Stars and Stripes flag and a caravan of much-needed supplies. In a brilliant book Claire Pettitt tells the story of their meeting and what led up. David Livingstone (19 March – 1 May ) was a Scottish medical missionary and explorer in central Africa. He was the first European to see Victoria Falls, which he named. He is perhaps best remembered because of his meeting with Henry Morton Stanley, which gave rise to the popular quotation, "Dr. Livingstone, I presume?"Born: 19 March , Blantyre, Scotland.


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Dr. Livingstone, I presume? by Ian Anstruther Download PDF EPUB FB2

"Dr. Livingstone, I Presume?" is a story of conflict and paradox that also takes us into the extraordinary history of British engagement with Africa. Clare Pettitt shows both the bleakest side of imperialism and the strange afterlife of a historical event in popular mythmaking and music hall by: 3.

The meeting between Henry Morton Stanley and the far from "lost" Livingstone was only the beginning. As a managed media event, symbolic reconciliation of Britain and Post-Civil War America and show of British Imperial power, the meeting had a long afterlife in parody, literature, film (with the Spencer Tracy as the American ally to Old World colonialism) and Stanley's stint as a /5.

OUT OF DARKNESS, SHINING LIGHT By Petina Gappah. The exploration of Africa by David Livingstone, the 19th-century Scottish doctor, has been written aboutPetina Gappah lists at Author: Caryl Phillips. Livingstone was clearly thin, ill and weak – and surrounded by a possibly unfriendly tribe.

Theologian and writer the Very Rev William Garden Blaikie was later asked by Livingstone's family to write a biography of the adventurer. His book, The Life of David Livingstone, published inincludes an account of the historic encounter. Clare Pettitt in Dr.

Livingstone, I Presume?: Missionaries, Journalists, Explorers, and Empire attempts to place both these men, and their meeting, in a larger historical perspective.

The writer Walter Benjamin once suggested that "History decomposes into images, not narratives" and Clare Pettitt attempts to pull us away from the image of the. When Stanley Met Livingstone. David Livingstone was the most renowned of all the explorers of Africa.

Among other exploits, the Scottish missionary and abolitionist had survived a lion. What really happened to Dr. David Livingstone. The New York Times bestselling coauthor of Survivor: The Ultimate Game investigates in this thrilling account. With the utterance of a single line—“Doctor Livingstone, I presume?”—a remote meeting in the heart of Africa was transformed into one of the most famous encounters in exploration by: 2.

A Doctor Livingstone Novel, I Presume. The 19th-century expedition that carried explorer David Livingstone’s body across Central Africa informs Petina Gappah’s historical novel. “Dr. Livingstone, I Presume?” By Awake!writer in Tanzania “Under the mango tree which then stood here, Henry M.

Stanley met David Livingstone, 10 November ” —Plaque at the Livingstone Memorial Monument in Ujiji at Lake Tanganyika, Tanzania. “Dr. Livingstone, I presume?” Yes, Livingstone was alive and working and Stanley would report back that he had been found.

The two men became close friends and even worked together for a short time. Eventually Livingstone parted from his friend and set off on further endeavors. On May 1,Dr. David Livingstone died. David Livingstone was a Scottish missionary, abolitionist and physician known for his explorations of Africa, having crossed the continent during the midth : When American reporter Henry Morton Stanley met Scottish missionary-explorer Dr.

David Livingstone inhis greeting was to take on mythological proportions. Drawing on films, children's books, games, songs, cartoons, and TV shows, this book reveals the many ways our culture has remembered Stanley's phrase, while tracking the birth of an Anglo-American Christian imperialism that still sets.

Upon finding Livingstone, Stanley reportedly asked the understated and subsequently immortal phrase, "Dr. Livingstone, I presume?" This illustration is from the french edition of Stanley's book "How I Found Livingstone".

Drawing Info. Artist: Henry Morton Stanley. Get this from a library. Livingstone, I presume?. [Ian Anstruther] -- This book is a biography of Henry M. Stanley, a journalist and explorer of Central Africa who is also famous for finding the missing Scottish explorer, David Livingstone.

The author provides a. Studienarbeit aus dem Jahr im Fachbereich Geschichte - Allgemeines, Note: 1,7, Universität Erfurt, Sprache: Deutsch, Abstract: 1. Einleitung 'Dr. Livingstone, I presume.'/ 'Doktor Livingstone, wie ich vermute.' Diese Begrüßungsworte, die Author: Delron Shirley.

Journalist Henry Morton Stanley begins his famous search through Africa for the missing British explorer Dr. David Livingstone. In the late 19th century, Europeans and Americans were deeply.

“Dr. Livingstone, I Presume” is a year old wholesale company offering trend-setting designs for the home, garden, and commercial environment. Our merchandise is an eclectic mix of antique reproductions, decorative accessories, furniture, gifts, and seasonal items.

Livingstone, I Presume?” By Awake!writer in Tanzania “Under the mango tree which then stood here, Henry M. Stanley met David Livingstone, 10 November ” —Plaque at the Livingstone Memorial Monument in Ujiji at Lake Tanganyika, Tanzania. COVID Resources.

Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

After reading one book, Livingstone later wrote, “Immediately I accepted salvation by Christ and vowed to devote my life to his service.” Two years later, after reading an appeal from Karl Gtzlaff (see Hudson Taylor, issue 52 of Christian History, page 35) for medical missionaries to China, Livingstone seized the.

Dr. Livingstone, I Presume? is a story of conflict and paradox that also takes us into the extraordinary history of British engagement with Africa. Clare Pettitt shows both the bleakest side of imperialism and the strange afterlife of a historical event in popular mythmaking and music hall : $David Livingstone: Mission and Empire (Book Review) Reviewed by Richard Laribee By Andrew C.

Ross “Dr. Livingstone, I presume?” is so familiar that it is oft parodied in skits and cartoons without need of further explanation. Yet in spite of such familiarity and numerous accounts of his journeys, including those written by Livingstone Author: Historynet Staff. Ever since H.

M. Stanley greeted Dr. David Livingstone, these words have inspired countless films and TV shows to bravely rely on a cliché. Sources, in order: Stanley & Livingstone.